Session Downtime

Downtime

Keeping time is difficult in campaigns, I tend not to. Joss Whedon once described actions happening at the speed of plot. I decided to make that into a personal code. However, downtime in an episodic-style game means that characters sit around doing nothing, which is utterly boring. I’ve decided to create a type of guideline for my characters’ downtime, partially modeled after my memories of Pendragon’s, partially off-the-cuff.

A. Downtime Length

Downtime will be measured, for TWSoE, in weeks. Every week between sessions is a week of downtime, rounded up. The only exception I will grant is in back-to-back daily sessions. Those have no downtime, unless otherwise stipulated by plot. Each week, a character will have the opportunity to engage in one Downtime Activity for self-improvement.

B. Downtime Activities

For each week of campaign downtime, characters will have the opportunity to engage in one of the following activities:

Characters can look for a side-job for the week. This job is not related to their actual occupation, though it may use one of their occupational skills. To search for work, characters will roll their Luck statistic.
- A success means they find opportunities within their skill set (one of their three top % skills). Roll a d3 to determine the skill. Lowest roll is the highest skill.
- A special success means they find a work opportunity within their specialty skill set (their top % skill).
- A critical success indicates a special job, one that may pay extra, or offer special equipment specific to them as a bonus, and requires another Luck % roll to determine the nature of the job. Results stack.

- A failure means the character finds opportunities outside their skill set (one of their bottom three % skills, non-base). Roll a d3 to determine the skill. Lowest roll is the highest skill.
- A special failure means the character finds work opportunities not particularly in their forte (their bottom % skill, non-base)
- A critical failure means the character finds work opportunities that not only are ill-suited for them, but for everyone else they know as well (lowest skill % of all Player Characters and Friendly NPCs).

Once characters find work, they need to determine the difficulty of the job. Harsh conditions, strict time-frames, unfriendly associates, all play into the roleplaying of this job opportunity. However, the more difficult the job, the more it pays. The player rolls a d4.

- 1: Job is particularly easy. Conditions are in their favor. +20% to the involved skill roll, payout is halved.
- 2: Job is standard. Equipment is exactly suitable, but not special. No bonus to the skill roll, payout is normal.
- 3: Job is tricky. Something is off about the work. -20% to the involved skill roll, payout is increased by 1/2.
- 4: Job is difficult. Things seem to conspire to make this harder on the character. -40% to the involved skill roll, payout is doubled.

Characters don’t specifically have to look for work on their downtime. They may want to focus on increasing one of their skills through training. Characters have a few options for training, depending on how intense they wish to focus on their skills. Regardless of the type of training chosen, that is all they are able to do that particular week. Note: as characters increase their skill, they will need to increase the type of training they use to improve.

Light Training (1-50%):
Character chooses a skill and rolls 1d4+1, increasing the skill % by that much.

Focused Training (51-75%):
Character chooses a skill and rolls their % with it. On a success, they increase that skill by 1d6+2%.

Intense Training (76%+):
Character chooses a skill, pays their current % in Credits, then rolls that %. On a success, they increase that skill by 1d8+3&.

Session Downtime

CT!: The Wrong Side of Everything SimonBailey SimonBailey